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Showing posts 1 to 10 labeled Story Structure (20 total)

The Underutilized Potential of Visual Novels (October 8, 2017)

The visual novel medium has MASSIVE potential to be awesome. But instead of capitalizing on that potential, developers put out mediocre games that are less innovative and engaging than static printed graphic and prose novels. More »

Crafting Tragic Tragedies (September 2, 2017)

The efficacy of the central tragedy makes the difference between a shallow romance and a touching one, a boring mystery and a captivating one, or a cliché fantasy and a memorable one. More »

Writing in the Age of Entertainment Overload (June 1, 2017)

In the publishing world today, there is only one "good" story: the unputdownable story. More »

What I Learned from Pride and Prejudice: Maximizing Potential for Happiness (May 2, 2017)

The magic of P&P is in its basic story structure. More »

With Great Authority Comes Great Responsibility (April 21, 2017)

When a reader picks up a book, she basically hands her heart over to the author on a silver platter, saying, "Do with it what you will." More »

Thoughts on Serialization (January 29, 2017)

I've been thinking about what works for me as a series reader, and what rubs me the wrong way. More »

Whodunit, Not Howdunit or Whodunwhat (September 5, 2016)

I love whodunits, but the books I borrow often end up being "howdunits" or "whodunwhats" instead. More »

Thoughts on Conflict and Tension (March 2, 2016)

Conflict creates tension, the excitement an audience feels when anticipating how characters will react to a situation. Tension is what makes fiction interesting and addictive. More »

What Is Romance? (December 24, 2015)

Romance is the promise of happiness. Love stories give people the dream of safety and stability with someone who cares. More »

American vs. East Asian Storytelling (December 17, 2015)

Cultural differences make it harder to identify with East Asian protagonists than we do with Western ones. More »