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Showing posts 1 to 10 labeled Characterization (15 total)

Writing Experiences Other Than Your Own (January 1, 2020)

We should all write about people from other cultures. How lame it would be if every fictional world were populated by characters from only one background. But we have a responsibility to write respectfully and well, in a way that makes the real world better. More »

"Complex" Does Not Equal "Unlikeable" (April 21, 2019)

I'm tired of the same old gorgeous, angelic virgins with mile-long legs and no flaws other than "adorkable" clumsiness and low self-esteem. More »

Where Are All the Complex Female Characters? (January 13, 2018)

Every book and movie made today features a "strong" female heroine, but it's still rare to find a complex one. More »

Writing What You Think You're Writing (November 11, 2016)

Writers who rely on telling aren't writing what they think they're writing. More »

Faux Strength in Female Characters (January 17, 2016)

Not every heroine needs to be strong, but if you intend to write a strong heroine, you should do it properly. You can't just put her in combat boots and call it a day. More »

What Is Romance? (December 24, 2015)

Romance is the promise of happiness. Love stories give people the dream of safety and stability with someone who cares. More »

What I Learned from Bridal Mask (October 9, 2015)

I recently started watching one of the highest rated and most recommended Korean dramas of the 2010s, Bridal Mask (or Gaksital), starring heartthrob Joo Won as the titular superhero. More »

What Makes People Like Hateful Characters? (July 4, 2015)

People often judge others by their words and interpersonal behavior, not by their actions. They identify with characters who are likeable on the surface, even if they're rotten to the core. More »

What I Learned from The Hunger Games (June 30, 2015)

The task of finding a popular novel to dissect for this project was a head-scratcher, until I spotted the perfect candidate on my own bookshelf: The Hunger Games. More »

Writing a Watson (May 1, 2015)

If a main character is not directly responsible for most of the significant events in a story, you don't have a protagonist. You have a Watson. More »